Diagnostic Testing

FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY

FUNDUS PHOTOGRAPHY

Fundus photography is used to assist in diagnosing, treating, and following eye disease. It involves taking pictures of the retina. After your pupils are dilated, you will be asked to put your chin on the camera’s chinrest and forehead against the support strap and to hold steady. The technician will then begin taking multiple pictures of your retina. The procedure does not typically involve pain.

OCT

OCT

Better known as an OCT, Optical Coherence Tomography uses light waves to obtain high-resolution pictures of the structural layers of the back of the eye. Being one of the latest advancements in imaging technology, OCTs provide color-coded, cross-sectional images of the retina, important in the early detection and treatment of eye disease, including age-related macular degeneration, retinal detachment, and diabetic retinopathy. The OCT is a quick, noninvasive test. After your pupils are dilated, you will be asked to put your chin on the OCT’s chinrest and forehead against the support strap, hold steady, and focus on a target light while the technician takes images. The procedure does not typically involve pain.

OPHTHALMIC ULTRASOUND

OPHTHALMIC ULTRASOUND

B-scan ultrasonography is used to assess various eye diseases, including tumors. Often, this ultrasound will be performed when the retina or vitreous cannot be seen fully during the examination, due to blood, corneal scarring, or cataract. Sound waves are sent from a probe that is placed on the eye or eyelid to provide sonar images of the inner parts of the eye. The procedure does not typically involve pain. Images may then be stored for comparison to future examinations. The procedure does not typically involve pain.

FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY/ICG

FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY/ICG

A Fluorescein angiography is an eye test that uses a special dye (Fluorescein) and a camera to check for proper blood flow in the retina and choroid, which are the layers in the back part of the eye. After your eyes are dilated, you will be asked to put your chin on the camera’s chinrest and forehead against the support strap and to hold steady. The technician will begin taking pictures of the back of your eye. The doctor will then inject the Fluorescein dye into a vein, usually at the end of your elbow. When the dye is injected, you may experience a warm sensation. Some people experience mild nausea, but it usually subsides rapidly. The technician will then take more pictures as the dye moves through the blood vessels in the retina and choroid. After the procedure, you will notice a darker color to your urine and a slight orange color to your skin. The procedure does not typically involve pain.

VISUAL FIELD

VISUAL FIELD

Your visual field is how wide of an area your eye can see when you focus on a central point. Visual field testing is one way your ophthalmologist measures how much vision you have in either eye, and how much vision loss may have occurred over time. A visual field test can determine if you have blind spots (called scotoma) in your vision and where they are. A scotoma’s size and shape can show how eye disease or a brain disorder is affecting your vision. For example, if you have glaucoma, this test helps to show any possible side (peripheral) vision loss from this disease. Ophthalmologists also use visual field tests to assess how vision may be limited by eyelid problems such as ptosis and droopy eyelids.